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Think one at a time by: Jomel Bajar, PT, DPT,MS

A college professor asked his students: why do people close their eyes when they kiss?


Students answered it is what movies told us to while some said wide opened eyes will just be weird and rude. Most answered that shutting the eyes while kissing makes them feel the moment more. At the end of the lecture, the professor said that "yes", people close their eyes when they kiss "to experience it more". Closing the eyes shuts off your sense of vision; hence no visual signal is sent to the brain allowing you to feel that tactile sensation more. Otherwise, opening the eyes will send signals to the brain that would confound the mind on what to sense at that moment. The Journal of Experimental Psychology published this study (https://pure.royalholloway.ac.uk/portal/en/publications/out-of-touch-visual-load-induces-inattentional-numbness(52874a88-0dfa-49c9-8c20-5e35d82b855c).html)

which proves that the brain is unable to cope with simultaneous tactile and visual data.

That is the same with real life. Attempting to do everything simultaneously or trying to think about many things concurrently will just lead to chaos. Our brain’s capability has a limit. Let us not wear it out much by doing and thinking about everything at the same time. Juggling undertakings simultaneously can end up being subpar on each of these activities.


Yes, a human being is not just one thing. A person can all be a mom, a child, a grandmother, a doctor, and herself all at once. A student can think about multiple things simultaneously - his academics, his extracurriculars, his problems at home, his relationship with peers, and his personal needs. This article is not saying to completely shut-off all the other aspects of your life and focus on one. What it tells you is to not overdo things by putting too much on your plate. Try to perform a task the best and most focused;

you could then proceed to the next task after a pause or after finishing the previous task. Take a breath and recharge before going on to the next assignment.